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Elizabeth Sutton’s Long Island Art Studio

All That Glitters – Organizing an Artist’s Studio

· Home Improvement / Decor, Makeovers · , , , , , , , , , ,

I first reached out to Elizabeth Sutton in December after seeing her posts on social media. Recently divorced with 2 young children, Elizabeth had experienced a tragic loss: while displaying her works at Art Basel, two of her employees, also dear friends, were in a devastating car accident. One did not survive, and the other was seriously injured. In dealing with the aftermath of the accident, all of her artwork in Miami was haphazardly packed and shipped to her studio in Long Island City. In the process, many paintings were damaged, and she herself felt emotionally damaged.

When Elizabeth and I spoke, she talked about a feeling of chaos, both in her personal life and in her studio. And, she knew that the chaos would increase the following month when she would be closing a pop up store in Soho and sending all of the art and supplies there to the Long Island City studio.

Elizabeth also expressed how her art studio, once a place of great inspiration, was now filled with sad memories and completely disorganized. That’s when Resourceful Consultants got involved. Our goal was not only to organize Elizabeth’s Long Island City studio, but also to create a hip, fun vibe that would match the mood of the vibrant pop art that is Elizabeth’s signature style.

Elizabeth and I met in her studio the following month. We talked about the organizational challenges she was facing, and how Resourceful Consultants could help. Elizabeth demonstrated how labor intensive each of her paintings was by crafting a single butterfly, gorgeous and glittered, while we watched. We met her team in order to understand how they worked together and separately, so that we could determine how best to organize the physical space in the studio.

1Glitter

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Hand Me Downs…A Blessing or Curse?

· Children / Teens · , , , ,

Last Tuesday, at 6:45 AM, my house descended into chaos.  It was game day for my soccer-playing son, and on game days, athletes need to wear khaki pants to school.  As it happened, the same pants that had fit just three weeks before were way too short.  And if you have a teenager, you’ll understand that somehow, this was all my fault!  I half heartedly tried to convince him that the pants were fine, since he didn’t have a choice other than to wear them, until I remembered the box of hand me downs from his cousin at the top of his closet.  Disaster was averted, as I pulled out a pair of khaki pants in just the right size.  Lesson learned…if you have a teenage son, always have the next size ready to go just in case you’re faced with a rapid growth spurt, as I was that morning.

When you’re super organized, hand me downs can be a blessing.  You can save a ton of money and avoid buying the items that are worn infrequently.  On the other hand, if you’re the type that is likely to forget what you have only to realize your child outgrew the beautiful, almost new clothes a friend gave you before you remembered where they were, the hand me downs are a curse.  In this case, they just take up space, are stored for years, and then frustrate you when you find them.  So, if you want to avoid the curse of the hand me downs, here are some simple tips to follow.

  1. Have set times of the year when you pull out the hand me downs to see what fits.  The best times to do this are in August before buying new clothes for school, in April before buying new clothes for spring and summer, and in December just as things are getting a bit small.
  2. Only keep things that are in good condition. Sometimes, well-meaning friends who just want the bags out of their own homes, don’t check the quality of what they’re giving.  Make sure nothing is torn, stained, or otherwise in disrepair before you store the clothing.
  3. Consider the amount of time you’ll need to save the clothing before it will fit your child.  If you only need to store the clothing for a year or two or even three, then by all means take it.  But, if you’re looking at holding onto the clothing for many years, be much more discriminating about what you take.
  4. The best hand me downs are the seldom worn blazer, outerwear, and the special occasion dress.  Not as worthy…nylon athletic shorts and t-shirts that are relatively inexpensive when new.
  5. Contain and label the hand me downs.  For example, use stackable containers with labels like “Winter, Size 4”.
  6. If you need to return the clothing to the giver after your child wears them, think twice.  The effort involved here may be too much to justify keeping the clothes.